Five unusual road rules.

A stop sign

If you travel internationally with your camper van, then you need to know the traffic regulations in the countries you are travelling through. Some of these may come as a surprise.

#1 Avoid reversing in Switzerland.

As strange as it might sound, as of 2016, drivers in Switzerland are encouraged to avoid reversing. The Swiss have determined that driving in reverse is the cause of numerous fatal accidents. However, reversing is not prohibited anywhere and everywhere. According to the road regulations: “reversing longer distances is only permissible when continuing forwards or turning around is not possible”. If the worst comes to the worst, the judge will consider the specific circumstances when making a decision. One thing is certain: if the vignette in Switzerland is too expensive for you, do not simply reverse back over the border.

A white van drives along a mountain road

Reversing is also prohibited in the Swiss mountains.

#2 Pay attention to van hygiene in Russia.

Cleanliness is highly important in Russia. If the police think that your vehicle is too dirty, they can fine you up to 200 euros. The officers on the scene decide just how dirty the vehicle actually is. So when travelling through Russia, we advise you to keep your paint polished, your Mercedes star shiny and the windscreen clean enough for you to recognise the officers at a distance.

#3 Italian nights can be expensive.

If you are caught speeding in Italy, the fine actually depends on the time of day. The Italians charge 33% more for speeding fines between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. MYVAN recommends: simply keep to the speed limits at any time of the day! Nevertheless we didn’t want to withhold this fact from you 😉.

#4 Never overload camper vans in Austria.

Whether luggage loaded up to the roof or extra passengers squeezed in: you should never exceed the vehicle’s permissible axle load – increased caution is required in Austria. Overloading is particularly expensive and the fine can cost up to 2,180 euros. But just think of it as immediate assistance. After the fine has helpfully lightened your wallet by at least 7.95 g, the weight of 2,180 euros in bank notes, you will be that much closer to the vehicle’s permissible weight again.

A pile of suitcases

Overloading the vehicle is never permitted. But it is especially expensive in Austria.

#5 Always cary spare bulbs with you in Croatia.

If your van does not have xenon, LED or neon lights, then in Croatia you need something that almost no one ever thinks of: a spare bulb for the headlight. Whereas full petrol canisters are prohibited in the vehicle, spare bulbs are mandatory. We hope that our list has help shed some light on the mysteries of international road regulations.

View of the front spoiler with additional headlights from front-left

Spare bulbs are mandatory in Croatia and often requested by the police when inspecting the vehicle.

Sprinter

Regardless of what job you have to tackle – the Sprinter will make your day-to-day tasks easier. And even if those tasks are weighty ones, together, you’ll move mountains. Thanks to a host of different variants and over 600 optional features, the Sprinter can meet a wide variety of requirements.

Mercedes-Benz Sprinter
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